Tuesday, May 8, 2012

make a clothing for your dog

make a clothing for your dog :))

take your dog measures

1.cut fabric in this form . this part is for back

2.than cut fabric in this form . this part is for chest
saw the first part and second part by lines that are shown thicker

3. and than cut fabric in this form . this part is for neck (this part is optional )

4. put velcro on spots A , B, C , D , EF .
you will get something like this.
AND YOUR DOG HAS CLOTHING NOW ....I hope you understand all steps (english is not my first language). :))

knowledge about Rabies in Dogs

Rabies in Dogs: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Vaccination


Rabies is one of the most well known of all the viruses. Fortunately, through active vaccination and eradication programs, there were only 3 reported cases of human rabies in the United States in 2006, although 45,000 people were exposed and required post-exposure vaccination and antibody injections. In other parts of the world, however, human cases and deaths from rabies are much higher. Around the world 1 person dies from rabies every 10 minutes.

Who is at risk?

People that work closely with wildlife, veterinarians, and travelers are at the highest risk of exposure. Fortunately, there is a vaccine that is available to protect high-risk people. Animals that come into contact with wildlife and are not vaccinated are at a higher risk of infection. While the risk of coming into contact with the virus is very low, it nevertheless does exist. Because of the movement of carriers, there is always the risk of exposure.

Transmission of the disease

The transmission of the disease almost always occurs as a result of an infected animal biting a non-infected animal. Skunks, raccoons, foxes, coyotes and bats are the animals most likely to transmit the virus. There have been a few reported cases of infection resulting from aerosolization occurring in caves where large quantities of infected bats reside. Rabies virus does not live very long outside the host and remains viable in the carcass of an infected animal for less than 24 hours. The rabies virus is shed at high levels in saliva. However, being bitten by a rabid animal does not necessarily mean that the bitten animal (or human) will become infected. It has been speculated, that only around 15% of exposed people will contract the disease. Humans, cats, and dogs are only mildly susceptible to the disease.


After coming in contact with the virus, the bitten animal may go through one or all of several stages. With most animals, the virus will spread through the nerves of the bitten animal towards the brain. The virus is relatively slow moving and the average time of incubation from exposure to brain involvement is between 3 to 8 weeks in dogs, 2 to 6 weeks in cats, and 3 to 6 weeks in people. However, incubation periods as long as 6 months in dogs and 12 months in people have been reported. After the virus reaches the brain it then will move to the salivary glands where it can be spread through a bite. After the virus reaches the brain the animal will show one, two, or all of the three different phases.

Prodromal phase

The first is the prodromal phase and usually lasts for 2-3 days in dogs. Apprehension, nervousness, anxiety, solitude, and a fever may be noted. Friendly animals may become shy or irritable and may snap, whereas, aggressive animals may become affectionate and docile. Most animals will constantly lick the site of the bite. In cats, the prodromal phase lasts for only 1-2 days and they usually develop more fever spikes and erratic behavior than dogs.

Furious phase

From the prodromal phase, animals may enter the furious stage; cats are particularly prone to developing this phase. The furious stage of the disease in dogs usually lasts for 1 to 7 days. Animals become restless and irritable and are hyperresponsive to auditory and visual stimuli. As they become more restless, they begin to roam and become more irritable and vicious. When caged, dogs may bite and attack their enclosures. Animals progress to become disoriented and then have seizures and eventually die.

Paralytic (dumb) phase

Animals may develop the paralytic phase either after the prodromal or furious stage. The paralytic phase usually develops within 2 to 4 days after the first signs are noted. Nerves affecting the head and throat are the first to be involved and animals may begin to salivate as a result of their inability to swallow. Deep labored breathing and a dropped jaw may result as the diaphragm and facial muscles become increasingly paralyzed. Animals may make a choking sound and many owners think that there is something lodged in the dog’s throat. The animal will get weaker and eventually go into respiratory failure and die.


The current way to diagnose rabies in animals is to submit the brain for microscopic examination. Some new testing techniques utilizing skin and or blood samples are being studied and used in a few research settings and show promise as a way of testing potentially exposed humans and animals. They are not routinely being used at this time.


There is no treatment. Once the disease develops in humans, death is almost certain. Only a handful of people have survived rabies after extremely intensive medical care. There have been several reported cases of dogs surviving the infection, but they are very rare.

Vaccination and prevention

Vaccination is the best way to prevent infection and properly vaccinated animals stand very little chance of contracting the disease. While rabies vaccination for dogs is mandatory for all states, it is estimated that up to half of all dogs are not vaccinated. Some communities are also requiring cats to be vaccinated, which is very important because there are currently more cases of cat rabies than dog rabies. Some people estimate that less than ten percent of the cat population is vaccinated thus leading to the high incidence of rabies in cats. The standard vaccination protocol is to vaccinate cats and dogs at three or four months and then again at one year of age. A year later, a three-year rabies vaccination is recommended. The three-year vaccine has been tested and shown to be very effective. A few counties, states, or individual veterinarians require yearly or once every two-year vaccination for a variety of reasons that need to be explored more closely.

There is a series of vaccines that can be used to vaccinate people at high risk. There are some vaccines available for large animals also. The question of vaccinating exotic animals is a common one. There are no approved products for most exotics (withthe exception of ferrets), however, canine vaccine is used on some species to offer some protection. Vaccinating exotics or wolf hybrids should be dealt with individually in cooperation with your local veterinarian and public health officials. Keeping a wild animal that is at high risk of being a carrier such as a skunk or raccoon is never recommended.

Pet exposure

Any pet who is bitten or scratched by either a wild, carnivorous mammal or a bat that is not available for testing should be considered as having been exposed to rabies. Public health officials recommend that unvaccinated dogs, cats, and ferrets exposed to a rabid animal should be euthanized immediately. If the owner is unwilling to have this done, the animal should be placed in strict isolation for 6 months and vaccinated 1 month before being released. Animals with expired vaccinations need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Dogs and cats that are currently vaccinated are kept under observation for 45 days.

Human exposure

If an animal bites a human, the animal will be either quarantined or observed for a period of at least ten days to ensure that it does not have rabies. Whether or not the animal was currently vaccinated and the community that you live in will dictate the requirements of the quarantine. People that do become exposed to a rabid animal can be given post exposure vaccinations and a globulin (antibody) injuection to protect them against becoming infected. Any person bitten by an animal should wash the wound thoroughly with soap and water and seek medical attention immediately.


All warm-blooded animals are at risk for contracting rabies, however, some species are much more resistant than others. Transmission of the virus is almost always through a bite from a rabid animal. There are a variety of different symptoms and once contracted there is no cure, and death is almost always the outcome. The disease is very preventable through vaccination. While relatively rare in humans, the risk of contracting it, and the outcome of the disease make taking precautions with wild animals and vaccination of domestic ones essential.

Friday, May 4, 2012

Drever (Swedish Dachsbracke) dogs

The head is large, long and well proportioned. The eyes are clear, alert with thin, close-fitting eyelids. Although quite short, forelegs are vertical and parallel. His legs are straight, never bent like the Dachshund. The coat is thick, close-fitting, and flat all over the body. Coat colors come in fawn, black, or black/tan; always with the white markings on face, feet, neck, chest and tail tip. Canada allows all colors. The tail is carried with a downward curve. The upper lip is quite tight, and fits firmly over the lower jaw.


Alert, calm, friendly and even. The Drever is known for his ongoing slight wag of his tail. The Drever often wants to continue working long after its human companion has satisfied his own hunting instinct. It has a first-class nose and is a powerful tracker. Because of its short legs, it is slower than other hounds. This makes it ideal for maneuvering game toward the hunter's gun. The Drever is a steady worker, who hunts hare, fox, and occasionally deer; but this dog has the courage to pit himself against even a wild boar. In such cases, he circles and dodges the prey, warning the hunter by barking furiously. The Drever has an excellent nose and a musical voice which is much larger than his size would seem to warrant. The Drever was bred to be tenacious on the hunt and therefore it is very important that the owners of this breed are just as stern back when dealing with him in order to show him where his place is among his human pack. Owners who are determined, and consistent with the rules, displaying a natural firm but not harsh authority over the dog will bring out the best in this breed. Passive owners will find the dog to become stubborn and headstrong. Drevers who lack in mental and physical exercise and or leadership will develop quirks in their temperament. Socialize this dog well.

Height: 11-16 inches (28-40 cm.)
Weight: 32-34 pounds (14-16 kg.)

Health Problems

Living Conditions Good for apartment living. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Exercise These are active dogs with surprising stamina. When not hunting they need a daily pack walk or jog. In addition, they will enjoy a session of play in the park.

Life Expectancy About 12-14 years


The smooth-haired coat would do good with a regular rubdown with a damp cloth. This breed is an average shedder.


The Drever is a re-creation of the type of short-legged dog used to drive game toward the gun, the Drever was developed from the now-rare Weshpalian Dachsbracke and local hounds. The Drever is rare outside Sweden, but it is almost as popular there as the Labrador Retriever in its home country. In a short period of time this industrious breed has become the Swedish hunter's most popular companion. Drev means to hunt in Swedish, and hunting was what the Drever did best. Officially named in 1947, the Swedish KG gave him the nod in 1949. Since then, the Drever has become one of the most popular breeds in his homeland. Its personality is typical of other Dachsbrackes and Dachshunds. The Drever was officially recognized in Canada in 1956.

Dogue de Bordeaux (French Mastiff) (Bordeaux Bulldog)


The Dogue de Bordeaux also called the French Mastiff and sometimes called the Bordeaux Bulldog is a relatively short, stocky mastiff. The wrinkled head is massive, heavy and broad. Males can have a head circumference of 27-30 inches (68-75cm). The muzzle is somewhat short (1/3 the total length of the head), wide, powerful and thick, with a pronounced stop. The nose is large with wide-open nostrils, color depends on the mask of the dog. The teeth meet in an underbite. The upper lips hang thickly down over the lower jaw. The thick skin on the neck is loose, forming a noticeable dewlap. The eyes are hazel to dark brown depending on the color of the dog and are set wide apart. The ears are small, hanging down, in proportion to the dog and are darker in color. The tail is thick at the base tapering to a point. The chest is deep, broad reaching lower than the elbows. The legs are muscular. The coat is short and soft with loose fitting skin. Coat colors include various shades of fawn to mahogany with a darker red or black mask around and under the nose including the lips and eye rims. There are sometimes white markings on the chest and tips of the toes.


The Bordeaux has a good and calm temperament. It is extremely loyal, patient and devoted to his family. Fearless and confrontational with strangers, he is a first class watch and guard dog. Socializevery well with other animals, preferably starting from an early age to avoid them being aggressive with other dogs. The Dogue de Bordeaux snores and drools. Despite his fearsome appearance, the Dogue de Bordeaux is gentle with children and family members. However this is a powerful animal, and is not suitable for an inexperienced dog owner. The objective in training this dog is to achieve a pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in their pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success. This breed needs a calm, but firm owner who displays a natural authority over the dog. One who is confident and consistent.

Height: 23-30 inches (58-75cm)
Weight: 120-145 pounds (54.4-65.2kg)

Health Problems Most are healthy, but the breed can be prone to hip dysplacia. There are also cases of epilepsy, heartproblems and hyperkeratosis. Dams often have to have cesareans.

Living Conditions This breed will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are very inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Exercise Needs lots of exercise. They need to be taken on a daily, long walk. Dogs who lack in mental and or physical exercise can develop behavior issues.

Litter Size Often small.

Life Expectancy About 10-12 years.

Grooming Very little is needed. This breed is an average shedder.


There are numerous theories about the origin the Dogue de Bordeaux. It may be descended from theBulldog, Tibetan Mastiff and from the Greek and Roman Molossus, from mastiffs brought to Europe by the Alans, from the dogs of Aquitaine or from Spanish dogs from Burgos. At the end of the middle ages, the dog was used as a cattle driver and personal bodyguard. Lots of Dogues died during the French Revolution. After the war number rose again. Raymond Triquet and his French Dogue de Bordeaux Club saved the breed. The Dogue de Bordeaux is now thoroughly established in France and gaining popularity in other countries. The breed has served as a war dog, flock guardian, cattle herder, guard dog, trained to bait bulls, bears, and jaguars, and a hunter of boars. The breed was recognized by the AKC in 2008.

Dogo Argentino (Argentinian Mastiff) (Argentine Dogo) dogs


The Dogo Argentino is also called the Argentinian Mastiff or Argentine Dogo. It is a large, well muscled dog. The deep-set chest is wide. There is an abundance of skin on the muscular neck. The head is massive with a rounded shape from front to the back. The muzzle concaves upwards slightly, with a slight stop and is about the same length as the skull. The jaws are strong. The teeth should meet in a scissors bite. The nose is black. The eyes are set well apart, and are dark brown, light brown or hazel in color. The rims of the eyes should be pink or black. The ears are set high and are usually cropped to make them stand erect, and triangular in shape. The thighs are very muscular with a short hock. There are usually no dewclaws. The thick tail is long and carried naturally low reaching the hock. The thick, glossy coat is white and has no undercoat. While not accepted in all clubs, sometimes the Dogo Argentino can have a black spot on the head known as "pirata". This trait in the Dogo´s coat is accepted by Federacion Cinologica Argentina.


The Argentine Dogo is a loyal dog who makes a great guardian of the home and family. Playful and very good with children, giving kisses and cuddling. Highly intelligent and powerful, Dogos are easy to train if you are consistent, using loving but firm authority. The Argentine Dogo is not a breed for everyone. With the right owners even the more dominant Dogos can be submissive towards all humans and other animals. This breed needs someone who understands how to display leadership. Humans who are firm, confident, and consistent, this breed needs rules he must follow and limits to what he is and is not allowed to do. The objective in training this dog is to achieve a pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in their pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success. When you put this breed with a meek or passive owner, problems may arise as the dog will feel he needs to, "save his pack" and run the show. Adult Dogos can be aggressive with other dogs however, the Dogo does not usually provoke the confrontation but may if he senses another dog who is unstable. The breed needs an owner who can tell the Dogo it is not his job to put another dog in his place. They are good with other pets if they are raised with them from puppyhood. This white mastiff needs earlysocialization with other animals. It also requires early obedience training.

Height: 24-27 inches (61-69cm)

Weight: 80-100 pounds (36-45kg)

Health Problems *

Living Conditions This breed will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised and does best with at least an average-sized yard. Be sure to bring the Dogo inside when temperatures drop below freezing.

Exercise Give this dog plenty of exercise. They need to be taken on a daily, long walk or jog.

Life Expectancy About 10-12 years.

Grooming The single white coat is very easy to care for. Brush occasionally. Keep nails trimmed. They have no doggy odor. This breed is an average shedder.


In the 1920's the Argentine Dogo was developed in Argentina by two Argentinians, Dr. Antonio Nores Martinez and his brother Agustin. The brothers wanted an ideal companion dog that was also a good pack hunter and guardian. The breeds that were used in the development were the Great Pyrenees,Irish Wolfhound, Pointer, Great Dane, Dogue de Bordeaux, Boxer, Spanish Mastiff, Bulldog, Bull Terrierand a now extinct mastiff-type breed called the Dog of Cordoba. The result was a bullish, fearless hunter who also had great stamina. The white coat deflected the heat rather than absorb it. Unfortunately the breed earned a bad reputation in Britain when people started using the dogs for dog fighting, which is an activity still popular in many parts of South America and elsewhere. Rather than go after the dog fighters Britain has enacted a national legislation to control dogs in public. The Dangerous Dogs Act which came about in 1991 totally bans the three breeds Fila Brazileiro, Dogo Argentino and Japanese Tosa. A fourth breed, the American Pit Bull Terrier, is allowed but is heavily restricted. The dogs must be registered, neutered, tattooed, microchipped and owners have to carry insurance. The dog cannot be bred or imported and when in public it must be muzzled, leashed and handled by a person over 16 years of age at all times. This is a real shame. When properly raised these are all great dogs. A dog is what the master makes of it. Not all breeds are for everyone. People teach these dogs to fight giving them a bad name. Banning the breed is not the way to solve the problem. Some of the Argentine Dogo's talents are hunting, tracking, watchdog, guarding, police work, narcotics detection, military work, guide for the blind, competitive obedience, and schutzhund.

Doberman Pinscher dogs (Dobe)

"Deevo, the Doberman Pincher at 9 months old. He is shy, until he gets to know you, then he will be jumping all over you. He likes to go for walks, run around the beach, and to play with other peoples dogs. (very friendly). He hates when they stop playing with him to relax or rest. Every once in a while he will dig a whole, happens rarely. Rarely barks, Never tries to run after other dogs, always sticks to me were ever I go around the house, he never leaves my sight. Doberman are not aggressive as many people say, no dog is born aggressive, they are created."

Pronunciation Doberman PIN-sher

Description :

The Doberman Pinscher is a medium sized, squarely built dog with a compact muscular body. The head is long and when viewed from the side looks like a blunt wedge. The top of the skull is flat, and turns into the muzzle with a slight stop. The color of the nose depends on the color of the dog's coat, black on black dogs, dark brown on red dogs, dark gray on blue dogs, dark tan on fawn dogs and pink on white dogs. The teeth meet in a scissors bite. The color of the almond shaped eyes is various shades of brown, depending on the coat color of the dog. The ears are usually cropped to stand erect (cut at the age of about 12 weeks). The pup's ears have to be taped for a couple of months to make them stand up. A lot of breeders are starting to leave the pup's ears natural. If left natural they develop ears somewhat like a hound. The tail is usually docked at the age of 3 days. If the tail is not docked it grows a tail somewhat like a hound. Note: cropping ears and docking tails is illegal in Europe. The chest is broad and the legs are perfectly straight. Dewclaws are sometimes removed. The short, hard, thick coat lies flat. Sometimes there is an invisible gray undercoat on the neck. The coat comes in black, black with tan markings, blue-gray, red, fawn and white. When markings appear they are above each eye, on the muzzle, throat, forechest, legs, feet and on the tail. There is also a solid white color. While white markings are considered a fault in some clubs, in others it is accepted.


Doberman Pinschers are very keen, super energetic with tremendous strength and stamina. Dobes like to be with their people and are not suited to kennel or back yard life, they need human interaction and leadership. Loyal, tolerant, dedicated and affectionate with the family. Determined, bold and assertive while working, they are very adaptable, highly skilled and versatile. They are intelligent and very easy to train. They are an outstanding watch and guard dog and do not need additional protection training. This breed is not for everyone. The Doberman needs an owner who is willing and able to display a natural authority over the dog. All family members must be firm, confident and consistent, setting rules and sticking to them. Learning to handle the dog properly, as Dobermans can become stubborn and willful if allowed to have their own way. Everything must be on the humans terms. The dog is the follower, and the humans are the leaders. The dog will appreciate knowing his place in his pack and feel secure about it. He should be thoroughly socialized when young to prevent skittishness. Mental stimulation and a lot of daily exercise is important in order to produce a happy, stable minded Dobe. The Doberman needs to be consistently and thoroughlytrained. Dobes can be good family dogs if the alpha role belongs to the human and if they receive enough exercise, are well trained and are socialized with children. Although the Doberman has the reputation of being a very aggressive dog, this is just not the case. For example, Dobes make great therapy dogs. Issues arise when they reside with owners who do not display the proper leadership and or do not provide enough exercise. They are sweet and gentle with nursing-home patients - tippy-toeing over IV tubing and walking at the resident's speed (which can be very slow), while at the same time will fiercely defend his master if it becomes necessary. Dominancy levels vary, even within the same litter and the breeds temperament will vary greatly depending on how well the owners understand canine behavior and how willing they are to take the time to provide what the dog instinctually needs.

Height, Weight

Height: Dogs 26-28 inches (66-71cm.), Bitches 24-26 inches (61-66cm.)
Weight: 66-88 pounds (30-40kg.)

Life Expectancy Up to 13 years.

Health Problems

Prone to possible cervical spondylitis (wobbler syndrome) due to fusion of neck vertebrae and compression of spinal cord; possible inherited blood disorder (Von Willebrands disease); obesity in middle age. Also prone to skin issues, bloat, hip dysplasia, and congenital heart defects. The gene which produces the albino (White) Dobermans is said to be the same gene which produced the famous white tigers and lions owned by Siegfriend & Roy in Las Vegas. Some also believe the gene is a masking gene, meaning it "takes over" and masks the color that the dog would be otherwise. White Dobe fanciers say there is no evidence, that this gene carries with it any deleterious or adverse health concerns that are sometimes associated with all white animals such as deafness, blindness, or unstable minds. Some breeders beg to differ claiming the gene does cause health issues.

Living Conditions

Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised, but does best with at least an average-sized yard. Dobes are very cold sensitive and are not an outside dog. That is why police in areas where it gets cold are not able to use them.


The Doberman is very energetic, with great stamina. They need to be taken on a daily, long walk or jog, and need to be made to heel beside or behind the human holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the humans.

Grooming : Dobes need little grooming and are average shedders.


This is a breed of relatively recent origin. It was developed in Germany in the 1860's, presumably by crossing among the old shorthaired shepherds, German Pinschers, Rottweilers, Beaucerons,Manchester Terriers, and Greyhounds. The creator of this mixture was a German tax collector named Louis Dobermann. Dobermann had to travel frequently through bandit-infested areas, and decided to develop a watchdog and bodyguard capable of handling any situation that might arise. The breed is named after its originator (shortened by one n). The Doberman was first presented at a dog show in 1876. It was immediately a big success. The Doberman was first recognized by the AKC in 1908. Doberman Pinschers have many talents including tracking, watchdog, guarding, police work, military work, search & rescue, therapy work, competitive obedience and schutzhund.